CaptureA book I co-authored has recently been published by SAP Press and is available on their website. I’ve been asked by my SAP enterprise performance management (EPM) marketing colleague, Mr. Chris Grundy (who manages our EPM social media programs) to write a blog explaining why we wrote the book, and to describe the whole experience.  In this blog, I’ll provide a short overview of the book itself and in a second blog, I’ll share some of the lessons I learned in writing a book.

First off, the intention in writing the book was to explain in one place what financial planning and analysis processes are and how SAP software can make them more effective and efficient. The book is written as a primer for everyone interested in implementing SAP’s enterprise performance management applications to improve their strategic, financial planning and profitability analysis processes.

To that end, I truly believe the book provides enormous value to anyone interested in these functions and how software applications support them – in general and specifically, SAP applications. Enterprise performance management is an enormous subject that embraces many functions and business practices.

If you work in strategy, financial planning, or business analysis or a related field, and particularly, if you use or are considering using SAP software, then I hope you’ll check out Financial Planning and Analysis with SAP: SAP Solutions for EPM, by William D. Newman and myself.

Part 1 – The EPM Foundation

In Part 1 of the book, we define enterprise performance management, discuss it’s relation to business intelligence (BI), describe the financial planning and analysis lifecycle, and cover the key processes that occur in it. These include strategy development and translation (execution), planning, budgeting and forecasting, profitability and cost analysis, and internal monitoring and external reporting of performance. We also introduce the EPM portfolio from SAP.

Part 2 – EPM Products from SAP

In Part 2, we explore the three key EPM applications used to enable financial planning and analysis – SAP Strategy Management, SAP Business Planning and Consolidation, and SAP Profitability and Cost Management. We also have a chapter on SAP Financial Information Management, the “glue” for integrating SAP’s EPM solutions. Lastly, we discuss the use of both SAP’s EPM products and BI tools for continuous performance monitoring and support of reporting requirements.

Part 3 – Leveraging Capabilities from Alternative Software Solutions

An important component of EPM applications is financial consolidation. This is the sister of financial planning, so we include one chapter on it just for completeness. For more information on financial consolidation you can read Accelerated Financial Closing with SAP by Birgit Starmanns.

Deploying an EPM application shouldn’t be a protracted process. While they may embody sophisticated forecasting and modelling processes, they aren’t massive ERP applications. Therefore, the implementation times should be correspondingly shorter.

Customers are also looking for pre-built content and best practices. SAP bundles (and sells) pre-built content along with the underlying applications and a prescribed set of services that are called rapid deployment solutions (RDS). We discuss the RDS’s that currently exist to help accelerate the adoption of SAP’s EPM solutions within financial planning and analysis.

EPM is a broad domain and uses data pulled from many other systems and sources, particularly ERP and data warehouses. Therefore, it would be remiss not to include some discussion of peripheral solutions, integrating SAP EPM with them and investigating how to extend EPM capabilities into other SAP solutions.

Part 4 – The Future of Enterprise Performance Management

Anybody involved with financial planning and analysis (whether on the business or IT side) is well aware of the developments in Big Data, cloud, and mobility, along with innovations in analytics. These advances are beginning to change the way we access and use applications along with providing additional power, capability and convenience. This last section talks about the relevance of these emerging technologies and highlights the future and planned innovations for EPM from SAP.

Wrapping it up

As I wrote in the forward,

When writing this book, we focused on four key processes in financial planning and analysis, which themselves are composed of many sub-processes and activities. That’s a ton of stuff before we even begin to think about SAP’s EPM portfolio. On top of this, we have to consider the turmoil from a rapidly changing global business environment and huge technology shifts that are dramatically changing the way in which applications are built, deployed, and used. To say that writing this book was a massive undertaking would be an understatement to say the least. However, we believe that it fills a void and hope that it will help all readers better grasp the issues and importance of EPM.